If you haven't checked out our Youtube channel yet, we highly recommend it! You'll find all sorts of interesting videos that ask people to answer a tough question with just one answer. Plus, we offer videos of people playing the game, if you've been curious but haven't taken the plunge to purchase just yet.

And, of course, we feature our Roundtable discussions. These are groups of people who play the game and answer the questions with a raw honesty. It's a great way to get a sense of how playing the game can go with you and your friends and family. And it's also really entertaining!

So if you need a break from the news or work, check out our Youtube channel and let us know your own answers to these questions.

Talking about apologies

One of our roundtable discussions asked people: Under what circumstances have you given a heartfelt apology? This is a tough question and you can tell that for some of the participants, it was hard to answer. But we think their honesty is brave and something we've all experienced.

You can watch the video or read the transcript below.

Transcript:

Under what circumstances have you given a heartfelt apology?

Hmm… well I had to apologize to a friend or just
recognizing my own shortcomings as a supportive friend for her and promising to do better. You can't get to the heartfelt apology part without
recognizing where your own right shortcomings were to get there.

I a couple months ago had a really bad conversation with my mom where I said some personal stuff that I shouldn't have said and it like triggered her and it was of such a sad phone conversation that got really ugly and then ten minutes later I had to call and be like I'm so sorry I did intentionally use a few words that I knew would hurt you and I'm so sorry. It was mature kind of like a accidental landmine you know and then you realize how bad words can hurt

We wanted to bring this blog topic back and give it a good refresh because it's just that important. Asking better, and more compassionate, questions can lead to far more enjoyable conversations and outcomes. From tips on brainstorming good questions to smart resources and a whole lot more, we compile articles, blogs, and videos to help you challenge how you ask questions.

The Importance of good questions

components of the game how do you see the world?

Questions are the way we connect with others and learn more about them. And that goes for friends, family, partners, and coworkers. The way we shape a question sets the tone for a conversation and it’s important to recognize how you can elevate a connection simply by asking questions in a kind, respectful, and open way.

Not sure what we mean or what a well organized question looks like? Just check out some of the cards from our games How Do You See The World? and Why Can't We All Just Get Along? to get some ideas. This is a great place to start if you need some simple and accessible visuals.

Questions at work

ask better questions at work

Two professors at the Harvard Business School discuss what makes a great question and how it’s important to think about what outcome you want: do you want that person to like you or are you trying to get more information about an issue? You can listen here or read the transcript for some great information. And you may want to check out their article, too, The Surprising Power of Questions.

If you've already checked out that article from the last time we covered this topic, then consider this great article (and exercise!) for changing the way you shape questions at work. Stephen Shapiro walks readers through an exercise that makes a powerful point about how we tend to shape our questions.

And for even more in-depth discussion of the kinds of questions we can ask, turn to this article in Ascend called Relearning the Art of Asking Questions.

Asking friends deeper questions

As this great blog post explains, “asking appropriate and open-ended questions, mixed with some of your own comments and observations, is the formula for lively conversation.” And that’s just the beginning of some solid advice for practicing mindfulness in social situations.

Perhaps you are tired of the general small talk questions at most social events: so what do you do? Do you have any hobbies? How about that game last night? If so, then this list helps you think outside the box to cut through small talk and get genuine, interesting conversations started with anyone.

The Kitchn also provides a great and accessible list of questions to ask if you are meeting an old friend and just need something new to spark that exciting chat again. You can never know everything about someone, even our oldest friends, so consider this list to bring a little excitement to your next dinner out.

We know that we love our game How Do You See The World? and you know that we love it, but we realize that everyone can't just take our word for it. If you've been curious about the game, but haven't yet committed to adding it to your game night collection, then we have a few reviews just for you.

Take it from these people, who have played the game and are happy to share their surprise, experiences, and more with you. And if you decide to take the plunge and buy the game, we'd love to hear from you! Let us know what you learned or what surprised you when you played with others. And even better, how you surprised yourself. You never know what you may be asked and what you uncover about yourself.

If you missed our first round of reviews, you can check it out here. But if you are just looking for a few more opinions, then enjoy the reviews below!

A Parent's Perspective

photo of Grace, who is a parent to both a tween and a teenager

We think How Do You See The World? is great for kids, especially teens and tweens. But take it from Grace, who is a parent to both, and watch her review here.

We also enjoy the interaction between the father and daughter in this video, who show what it's like to casually play together. You can learn so much by asking questions from the game and really listening to what your parent, child, or partner has to say.

Amazon Reviews

Want to hear more from people who've played the game? Then it's time to break out the Amazon reviews!

From JC: "I absolutely love this game. It is such a blast to play. I recently played it with my friends and some new friends, it was a fun way to find things out about new people and listen to what is important to them. I highly recommend for all ages, as a college student, I will be using this often to get to know other people. Definitely worth the purchase!"

From Giff Crosby: "We got this simple and brilliant game maybe two weeks ago. It has already sparked several priceless, evening-long, revelation-filled conversations with family and friends that I don’t think we’d have ever had without it."

From Lora Mays: "Love this! It has a permanent place in my kitchen and is used as frequently as the salt and pepper. We often pull a single card and read a single question but other times we play for hours. Always amazed by the responses (my own and others)."

However you play, we hope you enjoy the game, too! Let us know what you think anytime.

We know that we love our game How Do You See The World? and you know that we love it, but we realize that everyone can't just take our word for it. If you've been curious about the game, but haven't yet committed to adding it to your game night collection, then we have a few reviews just for you.

Take it from these people, who have played the game and are happy to share their surprise, experiences, and more with you. And if you decide to take the plunge and buy the game, we'd love to hear from you! Let us know what you learned or what surprised you when you played with others. And even better, how you surprised yourself. You never know what you may be asked and what you uncover about yourself.

How The Game Helps Those Who Are a Bit Shy

Feel shy at parties or events? Not sure what questions to ask? Check out this review from Heather who shares those feelings and had a great experience with the game!

Top Review Comments from Amazon

open box showing the cards of the game how do you see the world?

Reviewers have been sharing their thoughts about the game for some time on Amazon, but we've compiled some of our favorites that get at the real heart (and fun!) of the game.

From Caren: "I could not have predicted the great conversations that took place and the the things I learned about my own kids and how they see the world. Our friends loved it as well and I think just bought the last copy on Amazon. Highly recommend this great new game as a connector, unifier and fantastic break from the divided screen-filled world we live in. Thank you!!"

And don't worry, there are plenty of copies available online!

From Shelley: "Amazing game for opening your mind, learning about yourself and friends, provoking thought, acceptance and change. Play alone for some soul searching or with family and friends to learn about each other and deepen relationships. It WOWs me everytime I pick it up."

From G Rand: "I have used these cards with my family (including teens who rarely talk!), at a dinner with some colleagues, and with friends. Every time I've played I've seen people open up and share information in inspiring ways. Everyone has walked away seeming a bit awestruck by the conversations that ensued and the things we learned about each other. I've seen and played with other games that have the same idea but I've never seen one where the questions were just so...perfect! Really, it's clear that tremendous thought was put into these. I heard about these from a friend and am so glad I took the leap to buy them. I think they will be a go-to gift for me to give in the future."

Over the month of February, we posted several blogs focusing on how we can ask better questions. The first one covered coworkers and friends, with a second one tackling how to ask better questions of your partner. For the last installment in our February series, we have another round-up of great videos and articles that give direct tips on what you can change when you ask questions.

World-Class Questions

As we showed in our last blog, experts have outlined that often the way we pose a question is far more important than the answer. And you need only look at science to understand that idea a bit better. As this great TedX Talk explains, some unsolved questions in science, philosophy, mathematics, and humanities are considered to be “better” than others. And that is largely due to the fact that these world-class questions have spawned years of study, investment, and much more. The Ted Talk gives some great advice, too, on how you can create and ask better questions in your own personal and work endeavors.

Questions for Innovation

group of business people gathered behind a computer screen

Asking smart questions is also a key hallmark of innovators. As this article lays out, we ask lots of questions as children as we attempt to understand the whys of the world. But we tend to lose that unending desire to understand things as we grow older, though we certainly don’t have to! It’s possible to keep learning and inspiring just by asking more thoughtful and open-ended questions.

Warren Berger, via this article in Inc, also lays out why questions are important to innovation in business, too: “When so much information is readily available to anyone online, the key to innovation is not gathering more data but rather asking more questions--the ambitious, frame-changing sort that send companies down unexpected paths of inquiry.” This article does a great job of laying out the important questions to ask when innovation is at stake and even draws direct links between important questions that were asked and new companies that came about to solve those questions. Innovation can be just the right question away!

If you have a meeting coming up and you want to know how to inject it with more innovative possibilities, this article lists questions that are open-ended and get people thinking. Breaking questions into important categories, there’s something for everyone who is tackling a work/business problem or just looking for more creative solutions.

Questions are the way we connect with others and learn more about them. And that goes for friends, family, partners, and coworkers. The way we shape a question sets the tone for a conversation, but the communication doesn’t stop there: it’s also important to really listen to the answers you hear. But the answers you receive will largely depend on the way you ask a question, so it becomes important to know how to ask better questions of those around you to open communication, find common ground, and aim for a better, more positive outcome.

The Importance of Good Questions

man interviewing another man over coffee

An easy way to think about this is to consider an interview you really enjoyed. Why did you like it? What qualities did it have? How did you feel about the interviewer? Often the reason we enjoy an interview is not just because of who is being interviewed, but more because of what questions the interviewer asks. Do you prefer one late-night talk show host over another? That might be because of the way he or she asks questions.

Many of us want to be engaged when we listen to interviews and, possibly, even hear our own questions asked. And that same desire translates to conversations you have with others: you want to be engaged and so does the person you’re talking to. Conversations are far more rewarding when we ask good, thoughtful questions because all parties are engaged in the question and the answer.

Questions Unlock More Than Answers

two men conversing on bench

Terry Heick, who is the founder of TeachThought, talks about the lessons we can learn from bad questions in his article “Why Questions Are More Important Than Answers.” Although speaking from the perspective of the teacher, much of what he discusses can be translated to everyday conversations. From what makes a bad question (Heick says a bad questions is a confusing one) to timing and figuring out what you want a question to do, there are lots of ways to approach asking better questions.

Heick also supports the idea that asking better questions is far more important than being right or seeking correctness: “Questioning is the art of learning. Learning to ask important questions is the best evidence of understanding there is, far surpassing the temporary endorphins of a correct ‘answer.’” The Harvard Business Review also tackles this idea, noting that “Most people don’t grasp that asking a lot of questions unlocks learning and improves interpersonal bonding.”

Where To Start

Both articles referenced above give great tips on how you can start tailoring your questions to open conversations, learn more, and engage people better. There are many angles to consider, too, from the sequence of words to how much detail you include. It’s definitely an art that takes practice, but the reward will be great.

And if you feel particularly stuck, you can always take questions from How Do You See The World? and bring those into your daily life. The questions in the game are constructed to get people to think, to spark learning, and to create conversations -- not focus on correct answers. So grab a card and start asking!

For the month of February, we are focusing on how you can ask better questions. From tips on brainstorming good questions to smart resources and a whole lot more, we will compile relevant articles, blogs, and videos to help you challenge how you ask questions.

Questions are the way we connect with others and learn more about them. And that goes for friends, family, partners, and coworkers. The way we shape a question sets the tone for a conversation and it’s important to recognize how you can elevate a connection simply by asking questions in a kind, respectful, and open way.

Asking Good Questions in Business

ask better questions at work

Two professors at the Harvard Business School discuss what makes a great question and how it’s important to think about what outcome you want: do you want that person to like you or are you trying to get more information about an issue? You can listen here or read the transcript for some great information. And you may want to check out their article, too, The Surprising Power of Questions.

The 4 Keys to Asking Better Questions -- This article has some quick advice for those looking to revamp the way they think about questions before a big meeting.

If work feels stagnant or you just need some perspective, you can also focus on asking yourself thoughtful questions. This article has some great questions that every employee should consider.

Engaging Friends with Better Questions

ask better questions of your friends

As this great blog post explains, “asking appropriate and open-ended questions, mixed with some of your own comments and observations, is the formula for lively conversation.” And that’s just the beginning of some solid advice for practicing mindfulness in social situations.

Perhaps you are tired of the general small talk questions at most social events: so what do you do? Do you have any hobbies? How about that game last night? If so, then this list helps you think outside the box to cut through small talk and get genuine, interesting conversations started with anyone.

The Kitchn also provides a great and accessible list of questions to ask if you are meeting an old friend and just need something new to spark that exciting chat again. You can never know everything about someone, even our oldest friends, so consider this list to bring a little excitement to your next dinner out.

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